Category Archives: Cooking for Life Week Two

Day Ten (or, the craic with coconuts)

We had been in the Asian Market to pick up some last-minute ingredients for Friday’s feast of green papaya salad with griddled poussin; stir-fried mussels with chilli jam and Thai basil; stir-fried beef with cumin, onions and chillies; green curry of halibut with pea aubergines; and southern grilled prawn curry. It turns out that Thursday is the day the delivery arrives from Thailand, and so the best day to pick up fresh produce. Read the rest of this entry

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Day Nine (or, one degree from melting)

We’ve been whipping up some mighty fine ice-creams these last two weeks at Dublin Cookery School. Yesterday’s apple and cinnamon ice-cream (served with apple cake and caramel sauce) was particularly delicious. Read the rest of this entry

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Day Eight (or, don’t sweat the sauté)

I worked in a restaurant once and a very successful restaurant it became too. But in the opening months the head chef was a man who had clearly been trained in the kinds of restaurants where mayonnaise was not made from egg yolks slowly whisked with olive oil and mustard, but instead (a) came from catering vats so enormous you could happily use them as spare seating at a busy barbecue, and (b) was called salad cream. Read the rest of this entry

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Day Seven (or, in defence of offal)

Supper tonight: Chicken liver patè loaded onto brown yeast bread which had been warmed under the grill and moistened with clarified butter, served with a dollop of Crossogue rhubarb relish and a salad of shaved fennel, apple and spring onion tossed in lemon juice and a pepper olive oil. Read the rest of this entry

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Day Six (or, on the meatiness of monkfish)

“You came in this morning and handled me like a piece of meat,
You have to be a man to know how good that feels.”
A line that, it turns out, could easily have been spoken by a monkfish… Read the rest of this entry

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